CIA’s Brennan: Trump is "afraid" of Putin and "has something to fear"

Former CIA director John Brennan fears for the future of the United States with "impetuous" Trump at the helm and is speaking out.

This morning on MSNBC's Morning Joe he expressed a deep concern "about our national security."

Five minutes into the interview (with every word of the 17-minute interview worth listening to), Brennan says that Trump "is afraid of the president of Russia...The Russians might have something on him personally." He goes on to say that Trump has a "fawning attitude" towards Putin and has not said anything negative towards him...he has something to fear."

Brennan also says that he has worked with six presidents, and although he didn't agree with some of their policies, "all of them, ALL of them were trying to do what they thought was best for the United States. That's not Mr. Trump."

In the interview Brennan refers to Trump as "mean-spirited," "dishonest," "self absorbed," and showing "a lack of integrity," and said "our future is in jeopardy while Mr. Trump continues his antics."

He looks at the camera and says to Trump, "America will triumph over you."

The ‘WKRP in Cincinnati’ closing theme lyrics are all gibberish

Remember that rock song at the end of WKRP in Cincinnati? The one that ends with a kitten meowing? Well, today I learned that its lyrics are complete gibberish.

Go ahead, listen to it, I'll wait.

All gibberish!

Here's its story, according to the wiki:

The closing theme, "WKRP In Cincinnati End Credits", was a hard rock number composed and performed by Jim Ellis, an Atlanta musician who recorded some of the incidental music for the show. According to people who attended the recording sessions, Ellis didn't yet have lyrics for the closing theme, so he sang nonsense words to give an idea of how it would sound. Wilson decided to use the words anyway, since he felt that it would be funny to use lyrics that were deliberately gibberish, as a satire on the incomprehensibility of many rock songs. Also, because CBS always had an announcer talking over the closing credits, Wilson knew that no one would actually hear the closing theme lyrics anyway.
A big thanks to astute reader Mangochin for pointing this bit of trivia out in the comments section for our other recent WKRP in Cincinnati post.

Ireland lost a musical giant this week

Irish music lost one of its legends this week, with the passing of Liam O'Flynn.

A player of the Uilleann pipes, O'Flynn, or as he was known by the Gaeilge iteration of his name, Liam Óg Ó Floinn, was born in 1945 to a family of musicians. In his youth, his piping earned him prizes at county and national levels, but it wasn't until he was in his thirties that he really hit his stride. As one of the founding members of Irish trad super group Planxty, O'Flynn helped to breathe new life to traditional Irish music by showing that it could be every bit as exciting and full of life as rock and roll. Without Planxty, there may not have been a Dexy's Midnight Runners; No Waterboys, Pogues, or Dropkick Murphys. We'd all be poorer for it. Plantxy's music left me with the impression, as a kid, that the tunes I played on the instruments I grew up with were cool. I had the privilege of meeting Mr. O'Flynn at a musical festival I was covering for a magazine back in the 1990s. He was pleasant and seemed genuinely pleased to make my acquaintance. The encounter left me feeling giddy for days afterwards.

One of my favorite songs by Planxty, Raggle Taggle Gypsy, has a tune lashed on to the end of it called Tabhair dom do laimh, which roughly translates as Give Me Your Hand. O'Flynn's rendition of the tune has been one of my happy places for decades. The Uilleann pipes are a difficult instrument to play competently. When he's in charge of the bellows, the music that comes out is emotional, and as full of love as the tune's title.

It makes me sad that the world has to go on without him, but I've his music as consolation.

Surgical resident judges the accuracy of medical scenes from film and TV

In this Wired video, Columbia University general surgery resident Annie Onishi watches ER and operating room scenes from some film and TV scenes, including Uma Thurman's adrenaline-to-the-heart one in Pulp Fiction, and gives her professional opinion on their accuracy. Although it's 20 minutes long, it's entertaining, so give it a watch... STAT.

Wired notes:

Correction: We misidentified the type of worm in the Grey's Anatomy episode at 5:23! It was actually Ascaris lumbricoides,not Strongyloides

Previously: Doctors diagnose the bad guys' injuries in 'Home Alone'